• Ashley Nicole

Less Common Writing Resources - Pinterest

We've all heard of Grammarly or ProWritingAid or some other similar editing software, and we all watch the YouTube how-to-be-a-better-writer videos (Oh, just me?), and we've all read the writing craft books of the great successful authors. But did you know there are other resources out there that can not only help improve your writing but make it more realistic?


In today's blog I'm going to share one of my favorite writing resources that not everyone may use to its full potential. Over the next few weeks I will be covering the benefits of:


  • Pinterest

  • Google Maps and Zillow

  • Reddit

  • Movie and Video Game Soundtracks

  • Nonfiction

  • YouTube


P I N T E R E S T


I definitely am a lover of Pinterest. I pin recipes, space saver ideas, outfits, etc. I also use it for my novels.


I create boards for each work in progress to pin things that are inspiration for scenes or characters. Looking at the board gives an overall feel of the story and it helps to immerse me into the world I am about to write. If you want an example check out my Pinterest board for my current novel at https://www.pinterest.com/a_nicole_writes/angel-story-inspiration/


You can also use Pinterest's vast collection of pictures to create collages for aesthetics for your social medias. Aesthetics can be a group of pictures that represents your novel or a picture and a quote from the novel or anything in between. Just a little tease for your future readers to get them interested.


Of course, lots of writers do this, but there's other ways to use Pinterest. What's that specific shade of blue you want to describe your main characters eyes? Shirt? Car? What colors are in a sunset? Pinterest has color charts.


What kinds of fabrics or shirt sleeves did they have in the 1930's? 1860's? What fabric pairs with silk? Pinterest has charts describing different fabrics or different eras.


Another great use of Pinterest is describing places. You can search a meadow, or creepy mansion, or coffee shop, anything specific and find dozens of pictures. You can then get a grasp of the lighting, the shadows, the things on the walls, what the floor is made of, on and on. So many details you could miss with the image you hold in your mind versus looking at the real thing.


One last thing is character models. You can find pictures and concept art that resembles the characters in your book on Pinterest. You can use these to better describe hair, makeup, facial expressions, etc.


In short, Pinterest is a great resource to better caption realism in your novel. Not everything you write needs to be described in such specific detail but sometimes it's the little details that readers thrive on when they're invested in the characters and their lives which you create.


I will be posting a new resource for this series every other week so I look forward to sharing more with you over the next few months!

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